Croatia

Last update 4.4.2018 | Published 4.3.2018 | €1 = HRK7.4

This page is under construction.
Corrections and hints are welcome.

Croatia mostly follows the European standard on fines, but be aware that Croatia is one of the few countries where you may end up in jail for speeding.
Unlike most Eastern European countries the limit on alcohol consumption is not zero.

 

 

Important numbers :
Limit – km/h 50 90 110 130
Fine +21km/h €135 €68 €68 €68
Fine +41km/h €270 €135 €135 €135
LICENSE unconditionally(1 100(2 140 160 180
1) Witdrawal period: 12 months.
2) By repetion within 2 years 24 months and imprisonment up to 60 days

TOLERANCE:
10% in all cases; additionally, outside towns there is no penalty for 10 km/h speeding.
Rumours say that you are safe within +10 km/h in urban areas and within +20 km/h outside.
Croatia in detail :
€1 = HRK7.4 Violation Fine (HRK) Fine (Euro) Points
+0-10 km/h 300 40
+10-20 km/h 500 68
+20-30 km/h 1000 135 1
+30-50 km/h 2000 270 2
LICENSE(1 +50 km/h and more 5 000-15 000 675-2027 3
+10-30 km/h 500 68
+30-50 km/h 1000 135
LICENSE(1 +50 km/h and more 3 000-7 000 405-946 3
1) 12 months
Values in Euro are approximate.
Points:

In Croatia you start with zero points. With 9 points collected during 3 years you will lose your license for 12 months. However, if you lose 3 points for one offence you will also immediately lose your license.
In addition to the speeding offences above, there are many more reasons for points):

  • Illegal overtaking: 2 points
  • Not stopping before a red light: 2 points
  • Drinking and driving, from 0.5 g/l in blood sample: 3-5 points

7 Comments

  1. Djuka
    09.05.2018 @ 20:40

    Reply

  2. Djuka
    09.05.2018 @ 20:39

    Here is a list of all speed cameras (some still haven’t been installed). None of them is marked and they are able to flash you from front and behind, depending on the direction it is facing. If you are from EU you will get your postcard.

    Reply

  3. Djuka
    09.05.2018 @ 20:36

    If you pay a fine on the spot, it is reduced by 50%. And if you pay (I think) within 8 days it is reduced by 1/3. Not all fines can be payed on the spot though (larger fines – can’t remember the limit), but I think that then you can pay 50% within 3 days.

    Reply

  4. Djuka
    09.05.2018 @ 20:31

    Tolerance is 10 kph for measured speed up to 100 kph. Above 100 kph measured speed tolerance is 10%.

    Reply

  5. Remy
    05.04.2018 @ 19:18

    I drove past a radar enforced police checkpoint last August in a Slovenian registered car at 55 km/h (according to the speedometer) where the limit is 50 km/h and the officer just put his radar gun down after I passed and nothing happened, nor did I get a ticket later. I drove at exactly that speed since I knew it is a common checkpoint and that the tolerance of 10% is legally prescribed in their Traffic Code. No consequences either for a German-registered Audi that drove in front of me at roughly the same rate of speed :).

    In addition, the A9 highway in Western Croatia does not seem to be patrolled at all. The nominal speed limit is 110 km/h (except for the 2 bridges where it is 60-80) I have been driving there regularly since 2014 at 130-140 km/h without ever seeing a patrol car or speed trap or receiving a ticket later. Of course doing that is a bit more risky, and they recently announced a pilot project to supervise this road with drones.

    Reply

    • Deepak Lamba
      01.05.2018 @ 19:45

      Hi Remy,
      This helps. However I observed a lot of people were travelling with speeds higher than 150-160 on freeways in Croatia ( with max speed limit of 130).
      I was traveling at 140-150, but am not sure if I would get any fine for this?
      Also what about tunnels? In tunnels limit is usually 100, I was at 110-115 sometimes.

      Your answer would really help

      Reply

      • Remy
        31.05.2018 @ 21:54

        Sorry, I don’t know, I think the local Croats would be more helpful here. I heard that have been increasing the number of stationary speed traps lately (especially in Dalmatia, also on highways), and I also know that unmarked patrol cars aren’t uncommon on the Croatian part of the Zagreb-Belgrade highways. For tunnels: I’ve never driven through one on Croatian highways, but up to 10km/h shouldn’t be a problem – standard tolerance. My assumption is that sending fines outside the country isn’t that commonplace like in the Netherlands for instance.

        Reply

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