Norway

Last update 22.2.2017 | First published 20.5.2004 | €1 = NOK9.00

Norway has gone Norwegian when comes to the country’s reaction towards drivers who violate the low speed limits.

The speed limits are among Europe’s lowest, while the reactions are certainly Europe’s toughest. Motor roads with two lanes (Class A) may have a max speed of 110 km/h. The rest have a max speed of 90km/h or 100km/h.
The common speed limits outside urban areas are 60, 70 or 80 km/h.


 

Important numbers :
Limit – km/h 30 50 70 80 90 90 100 110
Fine +21km/h €933 €933 €695 €695 €695 €695 €695 €695
Fine +40km/h €1156 €1156 €1156 €1156
LICENSE(1 56 76 106 116 126 131 141 151
JAIL(2 76 96 125 136 150 150 165 175
1) 3 months – 3 years
2) unconditional, minimum 18 days

The controls are everywhere, they are done by both radar, laser, and civilian cars (lots of). The civilian cars are next to impossible to spot: They never sport double rear-view mirrors as in other European countries.
Radar-jammers, laser-jammers and detectors are, of course, strictly forbidden.

Norway is the only European country who regularly condemns its citizens to prison sentences for speeds that seem perfectly natural for citizens of other European countries.
150 km/h on a motor road under perfect conditions is enough to land you in jail for at least 18 days – unconditionally.
And remember that any license witdrawal is not subject to any court order as in most other places. The police may even take your license on the spot (you have to leave your car by the road) for 14 days if they only suspect that you have committed a crime that might lead to license withdrawal.
Limit Corrected
30 km/h 33 km/h
50 km/h 53 km/h
80 km/h 83 km/h
100 km/h 103 km/h
110 km/h 114 km/h

There is a margin of error in all measurements, they are – however – very small. Here are the rules for fixed speed cameras:

On roads with a speed limit up to 100 km/h, the drivers can be fined when they drive more than 3 km/h over the limit. On roads with speed limits of 100 km/h or more, the margin of error is 3%. The good news is that you will find no speed cameras where the speed limit is above 80 km/h.

For other types of measurement other rules apply. If you get measured by a following police car you will only get a safety margin of 20 meters. Which is very low and breaks with any accepted rule of safe measurements. I once tried to have a serious dialogue with the Norwegian authorities about this. In vain …
You may compare this to the rules in Spain. They are both easier (they go for all types of measurements) and more forgiving.
Thanks to Ørjan Torheim in Bergens Tidende for more info on this (in Norwegian, 2017).

Fixed speed cameras in Norway will always photograph you from the front. It goes without saying that many Norwegian motorcyclists take advantage of this…
Of special interest to motorcyclists is the sign “Overtaking forbidden” (or crossing a double line): Although the sign shows two cars, don’t be fooled. Cars may not overtake cars, cars may overtake motorcycles, motorcycles may not overtake cars. There sureley must be purely historical reasons for this and it is many years ago that the then Western German traffic authorities tried to change this rule. The rest of Europe, however, did not agree..
Of course, we all know that this is an incredibly stupid rule. In Norway, the rule is strictly enforced and will leave with a fine of NOK 5200 (€630) and no license for between 9 and 12 months.
If you see this sign (and even if you don’t see it), pay attention. It means that there is a road crossing ahead and the Priority to the Right applies. It means that a driver of any vehicle is required to give way to vehicles approaching from the right. In Norway where many intersections are not controlled with priority signs, this rule causes much confusion and often results in misunderstandings and accidents for foreigners who visit Norway:
If you drive on a road which is not explicitly marked with right of way, you must always stop for traffic which arrives from your right. This rule is strictly enforced and applies even if you are driving on a major road and the traffic from your right is on a minor road.

This rule, although based on the Vienna Convention on Road Traffic in 1968, is unknown to many foreigners. It is not implemented in the UK and Spain where all intersections are marked with give way and stop signs.
Wikipedia has more on this.

Why is this rule strictly enforced in Norway?
German Wikipedia has the history of this rule:
It originated with the Vikings and their ships and how the rudder was placed because the Vikings, then as now, are mostly right-handed …

Year City Country
1912 15 km/h 35 km/h
1926 25 km/h 35 km/h
1935 35 km/h 60 km/h
1955 40 km/h 70 km/h
1965 50 km/h 80 km/h

Source: Wikipedia – Fartsgrenser i Norge (in Norwegian)

Norway differs from most other countries due to the fact that Norway already in 1912 set a maximum speed limit and then, gradually, increased the limits. Other countries started with unlimited speed and later set limits and then gradually lowered them from the seventies and onwards. Here are the common speed limits in Norway from 1912 until today.

 norwegian flag of honour Welcome to Norway, the winner of the Burger Prize!

Norway in Detail :
€1 = NOK9.00 Violation Fine (NOK) Fine (Euro) Points
+ 1-5 km/h 750 84 0
 60 km/h and lower + 6-10 km/h 2 050 228 0
+ 11-15 km/h 3 700 412 2
+ 16-20 km/h 5 350 595 3
+ 21-25 km/h 8 300 933 3
LICENSE + 26 km/h and more Heavy fine
Community work(2
highest number for limit 60
+ 42 km/h
+ 50 km/h
Minimum 30 hours
JAIL
highest number for limit 60
+ 46 km/h
+ 55km/h
Minimum 18 days
+ 1-5 km/h 750 84 0
 70 km/h and higher + 6-10 km/h 2 050 228 0
+ 11-15 km/h 3 300 367 0
+ 16-20 km/h 4 600 512 2
+ 21-25 km/h 6 250 695 3
+ 26-30 km/h 8 300 923 3
+ 31-35 km/h 9 950 1106 3
LICENSE(1
highest number = Motorway Class A
+ 36 km/h and more
+ 41 km/h and more
Heavy fine
Community work(2
highest number for limit 100+
+ 50 km/h
+ 55 km/h
Minimum 30 hours
JAIL
highest number for limit 100+
+ 55 km/h
+65 km/h
Minimum 18 days
1) the lowest number is for “motorway” Class B (single lanes, no crossing traffic), the highest for motorway Class A (double lanes)
2) In 2007 it became practice to sentence the guilty to community work when the speed just surpassed the old limits. This means that you serve anything between 30 and 420 hours in unpaid work that is deemed good for society.
Source: Lovdata: Forskrift om forenklet forelegg i vegtrafikksaker and update for 2017. (Norwegian only)
Values in Euro are approximate.
Points / Prikker:

In Norway you start with zero points and lose your license for six months when you have accumulated eight points in the last three years. When you get your license back you start with 0 points.
In addition to the speeding offences above, these offences will reward you with three points:

  • Driving on a red light
  • Dangerous overtaking
  • Jumping a ‘give way’ or ‘stop’ sign, not giving way for traffic from your right, not stopping for pedestrians crossing/or trying to cross a pedestrian crossing
  • Crossing a solid or double-solid line
  • Driving with a too small distance to the vehicle in front of you
  • Driving with a trimmed motorcycle or moped
  • Failure to secure passengers under the age of 15

The official rules on Norwegian points (Norwegian only).

speeding_2012_406x434After driving in Norway for more than forty years I do, of course, have stories to tell (I once did 141 kmh on a Norwegian motorway with a jail limit of 140 kmh).
New, however, was my experience in 2012 : I found that Norwegian traffic police have for more than thirty years, despite warnings, used a method of speed measurement that has made thousands of innocent drivers lose their license and put some of them to jail – or pay a too high fine.
Read more on this in my blog.

License withdrawal periods:

Note that these rules presume dry asphalt in daylight on straight roads.

License withdrawals :
Speed km/h
License withdrawal (months)
30
56 – 65
65 – 70
70 – 75
75 – 80
80 – 85
85 – 90
90 – 90
Over 90
3 – 7
7 – 9
9 – 12
12 – 18
18 – 24
24 – 30
30 – 36
36+
40
66 – 75
75 – 80
80 – 83
83 – 87
87 – 90
90 – 93
93 – 97
97 – 100
100 – 105
105 – 110
Over 110
3 – 6
6 – 8
8 – 10
10 – 13
13 – 15
15 – 18
18 – 21
21 – 24
24 – 28
28 – 33
33+
50
76 – 82
82 – 90
90 – 95
95 – 100
100 – 105
105 – 110
110 – 114
114 – 118
118 – 122
122 – 126
126 – 130
Over 130
3 – 6
6 – 9
9 – 12
12 – 15
15 – 18
18 – 21
21 – 24
24 – 27
27 – 30
30 – 33
33 – 36
36+
60
86 – 95
95 – 100
100 – 106
106 – 112
112 – 118
118 – 124
124 – 130
130 – 136
136 – 142
Over 142
3 – 6
6 – 8
8 – 12
12 – 16
16 – 20
20 – 24
24 – 28
28 – 32
32 – 36
36+
70
106 – 110
110 – 114
114 – 118
118 – 120
120 – 123
123 – 126
126 – 129
129 – 134
134 – 140
140 – 146
146 – 152
152 – 160
Over 160
3 – 6
6 – 8
8 – 10
10 – 11
11 – 13
13 – 15
15 – 17
17 – 20
20 – 24
24 – 28
28 – 32
32 – 36
36+
80
116 – 120
120 – 130
130 – 140
140 – 150
150 – 160
160 – 170
170 – 180
Over 180
3 – 5
5 – 8
8 – 13
13 – 19
19 – 25
25 – 30
30 – 36
36+
90
Motorway class B
126 – 135
135 – 145
145 – 151
151 – 157
157 – 163
163 – 169
169 – 175
175 – 181
181 – 187
187 – 194
194 – 200
Over 200
3 – 6
6 – 9
9 – 12
12 – 15
15 – 18
18 – 21
21 – 24
24 – 27
27 – 30
30 – 33
33 – 36
36+
90
Motorway class A
131 – 135
135 – 137
137 – 139
139 – 141
141 – 145
145 – 151
151 – 157
157 – 163
163 – 169
169 – 175
175 – 181
181 – 187
187 – 194
194 – 200
Over 200
3 – 5
5 – 6
6 – 7
7 – 8
8 – 9
9 – 12
12 – 15
15 – 18
18 – 21
21 – 24
24 – 27
27 – 30
30 – 33
33 – 36
36+
100
141 – 145
145 – 147
147 – 149
149 – 151
151 – 155
155 – 161
161 – 167
167 – 173
173 – 179
179 – 185
185 – 191
191 – 197
197 – 204
204 – 210
Over 210
3 – 5
5 – 6
6 – 7
7 – 8
8 – 9
9 – 12
12 – 15
15 – 18
18 – 21
21 – 24
24 – 27
27 – 30
30 – 33
33 – 36
36+
110_TG50x50
151 – 155
155 – 157
157 – 159
159 – 161
161 – 165
165 – 171
171 – 177
177 – 183
183 – 189
189 – 195
195 – 201
201 – 207
207 – 214
214 – 220
Over 220
3 – 5
5 – 6
6 – 7
7 – 8
8 – 9
9 – 12
12 – 15
15 – 18
18 – 21
21 – 24
24 – 27
27 – 30
30 – 33
33 – 36
36+
For the official rules on license withdrawals, see Lovdata: Forskrift om tap av retten til å føre motorvogn (Norwegian only).

36 Comments

  1. Chris Hill
    19.10.2017 @ 22:21

    Just wanted to let you know that none of your blog links are working.

    “HTTP Error 404.0 – Not Found
    The resource you are looking for has been removed, had its name changed, or is temporarily unavailable.”

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      20.10.2017 @ 13:02

      Thanks for the report. I have not been able to replicate this erroe, it may have been due to a temporary server error. Please check again now.

      Reply

  2. Will
    13.09.2017 @ 09:39

    Hy. What the fine will be my blood shows 0.7 promiles. In oslo.

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      17.09.2017 @ 12:16

      Norway is historically strict on alcohol and driving. With 0.7‰ you will lose your license for one year, pay 150% of your monthly income and (possibly) go to jail.

      Reply

  3. H2H
    04.09.2017 @ 15:16

    Hi there,

    I have Norwegian License, and if i am fined in Denmark for High Speed, will there be penalty points also or just a fine.

    Regards

    Reply

  4. A. Mills
    17.08.2017 @ 20:25

    Hi Terje, I was recently driving home on the E18 and it was a 110 limit. As the road descended towards Tønsberg, I found my Volvo had climbed in speed from 110 to 113 without realising, just as I went under the camera above me on the steel gantry. To my absolute dismay, about 5km further on, the same thing happened again. Getting used to the weight and momentum of this automatic car is a real learning curve.
    Am I likely to see repercussions from this ?

    Reply

    • Ino
      19.08.2017 @ 17:51

      Your car’s speedometer always is a few km/h high than the sleed you’re actually driving. This probably already brought you under the limit. If that didn’t do it, the 3 km/h correction will do that. You were driving the speed limit or slower.

      Reply

    • Tommy
      19.08.2017 @ 21:48

      There are no speed cameras in 110 km/h zones, the camera you saw was probably a tollbooth.

      Reply

      • TerjeEnge
        03.10.2017 @ 17:56

        You are right Tommy. In Norway there are now more tollbooths than speedtraps. And that means a lot 🙂

        Reply

  5. Bernhard
    14.07.2017 @ 10:34

    Very nice information! I will be going on a motorcycle trip to Lofoten and now I know that I shouldn’t push my luck speeding!

    Reply

  6. Yuting Yang
    11.07.2017 @ 09:28

    Hi Terje, thank you for this amazing site! I was wondering if you know any databases containing actual traffic fine data (eg. speed observed, speed limit, amount of the fine etc.). Since I’m working on economic research related to the topic, if you have any info on that it would be great help. Thanks!!

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      14.07.2017 @ 21:13

      I wish there was! This would have made this web way more easy to publish. To my knowledge no such database exist.
      This web is the closest you get 🙂

      Reply

  7. K
    04.07.2017 @ 01:13

    I have a question I got a speeding fine being stopped by the police and on the fine it has the wrong number plate and the wrong date of birth
    Surely if there’s mistakes on the fine it’s not valid ?

    Reply

  8. KerenB
    30.06.2017 @ 20:57

    Does anyone know how to pay a speeding fine in Norway? I got a fine this week, but lost the piece of paper the police gave. Is there a website with info? Or a way of paying online?

    Reply

  9. Alex
    02.06.2017 @ 00:15

    This is a great source of information. Unfortunately I found it too late 🙂

    Do they report the incurred points back to my original country? This alone can be more damaging then the fine…

    Thank you!

    Reply

  10. Eugene
    11.05.2017 @ 21:54

    Hi my singapore license was confiscated will the police return back to me? I’m back in Singapore
    Anyway to check with police?

    Reply

  11. Eelin
    07.05.2017 @ 20:20

    Hi, I have just being caught by Traffic police for speed driving in Norway. The speed limit is 50km/h and they say we are driving at 86km/h. They are detain our driving license and say that they will mail it back to our Country. Anyway has an idea how much is the fine and what will happen if we dun pay the fine?

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      09.05.2017 @ 11:11

      My guess is around €1200 – and if you don’t pay they have the apparatus to track you down.

      Reply

      • Potocki
        10.05.2017 @ 00:11

        Terje, I am not an expert on Norway, but I believe the key issue is what is Eelin’s home country and whether he plans to come back to Norway. If he happens to be out of EU and doesn’t plan to be back to Norway, then…..they can kiss his….. trunk? 😉

        Reply

  12. Patrick
    20.04.2017 @ 10:23

    If you have a desire to pay the ticket you can just stop at any police station and show them the bill and they will help you. All police patrols also have to accept cash payment on the spot when they fine you, and the units from the traffic police (UP) also have online bank terminals so you can pay by Visa/MC/AmEx etc.

    Reply

  13. Leticia
    28.03.2017 @ 12:51

    Hello! I just spend a lovely weekned in Norway that ended up in the worst possible way. I got fined for speeding at 75kph in a 60khp area. The police (very nice man) stopped me, took my details and gave me a fine for 3700kr (approx £350) he said I have two weeks to pay and I could do so online. He gave me a paper with the banks details where I have to transfer the money. The problem now is how do I know if this is a genuine fine? In the fine there isn’t any link to any webpage were I could go to and pay and to me it doesn’t feel right to just transfer the money to a norwegian bank account without getting a receipt or a proof that I paid that fine. Does anyone know how can I contact them? or maybe a safer payment method? I know I did it wrong so I would like to pay also I would love to return to Norway and not been arrested as soon as I land. Thanks!

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      30.03.2017 @ 13:22

      I have been driving in Norway for more than 40 years and never heard of anything like this. The fine is correct and you can be pretty sure that this was a real policeman.
      I think you should transfer the money but you can also gamble and wait to see if anything happens. They do go after foreigners and if they find you it will be even more expensive.

      Reply

    • BT
      12.04.2017 @ 01:58

      I have the same situation like u Leticia, i receive a speeding ticket and it was given to me a paper with bank details behind it. Im from a foreign county too and im looking forward to go back to Norway again for vacation, so i will not gamble on it and i would like to get the fined paid. However, im not pretty sure how do they track on my payment if i were to pay by foreign transfer. There is no website address for me to log on to, its just a bank account numbers and details. Anyone encounter the same situation? If after i had done the foreign payment transfer, how do i make sure they updated in their system that i’ve paid the fine and the transfer of money is for my fine payment? Is there any website which i can track or checked to confirm my payment status?

      Reply

      • TerjeEnge
        13.04.2017 @ 16:39

        No, there is no website where you can pay or get a confirmation on your payment. Just keep your receipt. And no-one will have any trouble visiting Norway – even after a no-payment of a traffic fine.

        Reply

        • BT
          13.04.2017 @ 16:47

          Thanks TerjeEnge 🙂

          Reply

  14. Pappi
    06.02.2017 @ 19:43

    Hi everyone, I have been using a foreign drivers licence in Norway. My licence is from an EU country( Hungary), my licence was withdrawn from me a week ago for over speeding, my speed measurement was 78km/hr in a 50/km/hr Zone (main road daylight clear visibility), which is 2 km above the minimum speed for licence withdrawal (76km/hr). Now a friend told me i will be ask to re-do a new drivers licences starting from the very beginning as my licence is less than two years. Though the police officer told me it will take about three to six months to get it back plus a huge fine, maybe he didn’t know my licence is less than two years old. can someone advice me or have anyone been in similar situation?
    Thanks

    Reply

    • Ihatemycountryspeedlimits
      07.02.2017 @ 04:50

      I am pretty sure that having to redo the whole exam does not apply to foreign licenses, just like you won’t get any points on your license.

      Reply

  15. Ben
    28.10.2016 @ 04:20

    A motorcycling friend of mine (Australian) has just gotten back home following his three week stint in jail – and while there, was not able to be a steadying hand for an impatient colleague (french national) who decided to ride on without him to Sweden to wait for his release. That man hit an elk at sundown and died. The consequences of this zero tolerance attitude to breaches of road speed limits – in a first world country – is breathtaking.

    I agree with EA333 .. the inverse logic is astounding. And the waste of taxpayers dollars in court, police & lawyers, just beggars belief. I mean .. WTF?

    Reply

    • Sailor Boy
      25.08.2017 @ 06:36

      looks like stripping your friend of a license saved his life! Or he too may have been driving dangerously and hit an elk.

      Reply

  16. EA333
    21.10.2016 @ 15:07

    Norwegian logic : MINIMUM 18 days in prison for going 150 km/h on a motorway and MAXIMUM 21 years in prison for killing 77 people.

    Reply

  17. Bram
    19.08.2016 @ 22:30

    Hey Terje,

    Quick question: I understand the speed limit in towns in Norway is 50 km/h, but all around me I see Norwegian drivers ignoring the signs with the town name on it and just continuing driving 80 km/h. Until they reach a sign that explicitly says 70, 60, 50 or even 40 km/h.

    Does, or does not, the following sign imply a 50 km/h limit? https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/94/Norwegian-road-sign-727a.png/120px-Norwegian-road-sign-727a.png

    Or can I just go on driving 80 until I encounter a sign with a lower limit?

    Thanks in advance!
    Bram

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      21.10.2016 @ 17:07

      I’m not sure about this, but I think you have to reach a sign that explicitly says 50.

      Reply

      • Patrick
        20.04.2017 @ 10:27

        Feil, tettbygde strøk har fartsgrense 50, og ikke tettbygde har 80. Men hvis du kjører på vei med skiltet fartsgrense så gjelder skiltingen foran de generelle reglene. Samme med vikepliktreglene, vikeplikt- og stoppskilt trumfer som kjent høyreregelen.

        Reply

  18. AVee
    30.06.2016 @ 10:50

    Received a speeding ticket in Norway. They have my Canadian drivers license details. If the fine is unpaid and I am stopped by POLICE again, not that I am planning on this, what are the possible consequences? Do they maintain a foreign data base on moving violations in Norway?
    Thanks

    Reply

  19. wózki dziecięce 3w1 olx
    12.04.2016 @ 09:56

    I’m curious to find out what blog platform you’re using?
    I’m experiencing some minor security problems with my latest
    website and I’d like to find something more secure.
    Do you have any recommendations?

    Reply

    • TerjeEnge
      30.03.2017 @ 13:10

      This is WordPress with the theme Themify Basic. For the safety I use the plugin Akismet. I use WP on several sites, but I’m not sure to recommend it. Too complicated and often beyond control if you don’t resort to manual coding – which I have to do all the time.

      Reply

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